mimbeau:

Belleville : The little boy and the cat

Paris circa 1950

Willy Ronis

  July 25, 2014 at 04:01pm
via mimbeau

chemicallycurious:

Oh Lord, Nathan…that’s the best! 

I just got it in this week. Fancy popping round after work to give it a whirl?

  July 25, 2014 at 10:11am
  July 25, 2014 at 08:00am
via taleur

Jobyna Ralston and Harold Lloyd in Girl Shy (1924)

  July 24, 2014 at 04:01pm

pachucowildcat:

Vintage 50s Dress/ 1950s Party Dress/ Cream Sheer Party Prom Wedding Dress w/ Draping XXS

$67.00 USD-WhenDecadesCollide

mnesaretepeacetreaty:

Ustad Mansur - A Chameleon, 1612

vintagenatgeographic:

National Geographic | June 1960

firsttimeuser:

The Nile River, 1929 by Lehnert and Landrock

  July 22, 2014 at 08:01am

littlehorrorshop:

Harold Lloyd gets stage fright in The Freshman, 1925

bavierbrook:

Vintage Ring, Art Deco Diamond and Sapphire Frame Ring Platinum/14k c. 1920 - $750

  July 20, 2014 at 04:01pm

foundstylehabitat:

Vintage Tobacco Tin - Bell’s Three Nuns Tobacco Tin - Scottish Tobacco Tin - Pipe Tobacco Tin -2 Oz size - None Nicer - Imperial Tobacco Co. by OnlyCoolStuff http://ift.tt/LNJHDY

windsorhouseantiques:

EARLY 18TH CENTURY WALNUT LONGCASE CLOCK BY J ELIAS OF AMSTERDAM

Early 18th Century Walnut Longcase Clock by Johannes Elias of Amsterdam, showing phases of the moon within the arch, date and hygrometer lenticle, very well figured case.

Traditionally, longcase clocks were made with two types of movement: eight-day and one-day (30-hour) movements. A clock with an eight-day movement required winding only once a week, while generally less expensive 30-hour clocks had to be wound every day. Eight-day clocks are often driven by two weights – one driving the pendulum and the other the striking mechanism, which usually consisted of a bell or chimes. Such movements usually have two keyholes on either side of the dial to wind each one. By contrast, 30-hour clocks often had a single weight to drive both the timekeeping and striking mechanisms. Some 30-hour clocks were made with false keyholes, for customers who wished that guests to their home would think that the household was able to afford the more expensive eight-day clock. Most longcase clocks are cable-driven, meaning that the weights are suspended by cables. If the cable was attached directly to the weight, the load would cause rotation and untwist the cable strands, so the cable wraps around a pulley mounted to the top of each weight. The mechanical advantage of this arrangement also doubles the running time allowed by a given weight drop.

c. 1720

Height 94.00inch (238.76cm)

Width 18.00inch (45.72cm)

Depth 10.00inch (25.40cm)

Ref No. 4333

£18500.00

http://www.windsorhouseantiques.co.uk/stock/d/early-18th-century-walnut-longcase-clock-by-j-elias-of-amsterdam/164864